vADC Docs

Agile Licensing for Agile Applications

by aidan.clarke on ‎04-03-2017 09:14 AM - edited on ‎04-28-2017 06:25 AM by PaulWallace (756 Views)

Fixed-size licensing works for fixed-sized applications. If your application rarely changes, and sees a steady workload, then you can optimize the costs of the platform to match the resources you need.

 

However, most applications aren’t like that, and if you try to match a fixed-sized platform with a rapidly growing application and a varying workload, then you will need to plan ahead for much larger fixed capacity. In high-growth applications, we often see up to 10x capacity installed to manage future growth projections. Furthermore, as organizations virtualize their applications and infrastructure, or moving their applications to the cloud, we often see developer teams needing dedicated ADCs to manage isolated workloads.

 

Agile Licensing

 

Besides the flexibility of aligning cloud resources to the needs of an individual application, there is an additional advantage in application isolation, to avoid "Change Control" deadlock situations: "Agile" applications are unable to be "Agile" when they share infrastructure with critical applications and systems. So instead of sharing large, scale-up ADC platforms, developer teams often prefer to deploy an ADC per application, making it easier to make per-application changes and with the option to scale-up or scale-out later for greater performance and reliability.

 

The Brocade Services Director allows organizations to buy capacity in 2Gb, 5Gb or 20Gb blocks, and you can divide up and distribute this capacity to dedicated vADC instances, from as small as 1 Mbps to hundreds of Gbps, clustering for performance or resilience. Bandwidth packs are stackable, so you can start small, and top up your capacity as you grow. As the needs of each application changes, you can re-allocate the capacity quickly to meet changes in workload.

 

Get started with Brocade vADC today, our Developer Edition is free to download and try out in your test and development environment.

 

 

This article is part of a series, beginning with:

More to Explore: